Archive for July, 2008

Fat free foods and sugar

July 14, 2008

Many low fat foods are high in sugar. Read food labels and eliminate those with more than 11 grams of refined sugar per serving. (Bottom Line Personal, May 15, 1997, p. 16) That figures out to a little over two teaspoons of sugar per serving, still quite a sugar jolt. Copyright 1997 Phylis Austin

Sugar and fat intake

July 14, 2008

Sugar consumption may increase fat consumption by making high fat foods more palatable. When a British study group was given a diet low in refined sugar their fat consumption also decreased. (The Lancet 345:1537-1540, June 17, 1995) Unfortunately, the fats usually sweetened with sugar are the worst kind for the heart — partially hydrogenated fats such as found in margarine. If you are fat or sick leave off the fats! Copyright 1995 Phylis Austin

Sugar and colon polyps

July 14, 2008

High sugar intake increases the incidence of colorectal polyps. (European Journal of Cancer (Suppl 1)30A, 1994) Copyright 1994 Phylis Austin

Aloe and asthma

July 14, 2008

The Japanese have been using aloe vera extracts in the treatment of asthma. Asthma patients were given 5 milliliters of 20 percent extract from fresh aloe vera leaves twice a day. After 24 weeks 40 percent of the patients in the study reported significant improvement. Patients who had previously been dependent on corticosteroid medications were less likely to benefit from the aloe vera. (Alternatives 5(18)138, December 1994; Planta Medica 85:273-5, 1985) Copyright 1995 Phylis Austin

Weight gain leads to reduced respiratory function

July 14, 2008

Gaining one pound a year as a person ages may significantly reduce respiratory function. A weight gain of nine pounds may reduce respiratory capacity one-half of that which would be produced by
cigarette smoking.

Smoking, aging, overweight, and dust exposure are all known to cause a reduction in lung function, but until this study, the significance of weight gain was not apparent. (American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 153:1907-13, 1996) Copyright 1996 Phylis Austin

Respiratory function in children

July 14, 2008

Children whose mothers smoked while they were in utero, whose mothers had high blood pressure during the pregnancy, or who have a relative who suffers from asthma are at increased risk of respiratory problems. We have known for some time that newborns exposed to smoke are more likely
to suffer respiratory problems, but this study shows that material smoking may delay the development of the infant’s respiratory system. (Lancet 348:1060- 1064, October 19, 1996) Copyright 1996 Phylis Austin

Onions and asthma

July 14, 2008

Onion oils have been found effective in the treatment of bronchial obstruction associated with asthma. (International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology 82:535-536, 1987) Copyright 1987 Phylis Austin

Nose drops and respiratory infection

July 14, 2008

A group of 74 children, ranging in age from three weeks to two years, seen for upper respiratory tract infection were divided into three groups: one group was given saline nose drops, the second group received medicated nose drops, and the third group no nose drops. On follow-up there were no differences in the three groups. The authors of this study concluded that the use of medicated nose drops was not necessary in the treatment of rhinitis or upper respiratory tract infection. (Helv
Paediat Acta 39:341-345, 1984) Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin

Bronchial asthma and food allergy

July 14, 2008

A Netherlands study reveals that food allergy may induce bronchial asthma more frequently than has been recognized in the past. (Annals of Allergy 55(2)387, August, 1985) Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin

Car air conditioners and asthma

July 14, 2008

Fungi growing in car air conditioners may induce respiratory problems such as asthma, hay fever and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A study of almost 400 individuals revealed that about 18 percent suffered worsening of their symptoms after riding in air-conditioned cars. (Emergency Medicine 17:51-53, July 15, 1985) Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin