Archive for August, 2008

Depression, anxiety, fatigue, sugar and caffeine

August 10, 2008

A caffeine-free and refined sucrose-free diet may improve symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue in sensitive individuals. (Biological Psychiatry 29(7)679-692, April 1, 1991)
Copyright 1991 Phylis Austin

Premenstrual syndrome and sugar intake

August 10, 2008

Women who consume foods high in sugar content, or who have a sweet tooth, are more likely to suffer from premenstrual syndrome. (Journal of Reproductive Medicine 36(2)131-136. February, 1991) Copyright 1991 Phylis Austin

“Natural” vs synthetic vitamin supplements

August 10, 2008

Paul Stitt, a biochemist and food scientist for some of the largest corporations in the United States reports that government regulations require that only three percent of a food supplement be natural ingredients before the food can be labeled “natural.” He points out that because synthetic vitamins are so much less expensive it is likely that many of the “natural” vitamins on the market are 97 percent synthetic. He says it would require 30 oranges to produce one 1000 mg. vitamin C tablet, and a bottle of all natural vitamin C tablets could cost about four hundred dollars! (Stitt, Paul A. Fighting the Food Giants, Manitowoc, Wisconsin: Natural Press, 1980, p. 221)
Copyright 1982 Phylis Austin

Osteoporosis and vitamin C

August 10, 2008

High levels of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) given to laboratory animals produced a decrease in their bone density. (Journal of Nutrition 114(5)920-928, May 1984) Reduced bone density makes bone pain, humpback and fractures more likely.
Copyright 1984 Phylis Austin

Large doses of vitamin C may cause iron deficiency anemia

August 10, 2008

Taking large doses (1500 mgm daily) of vitamin C to prevent the common cold may lead to iron-deficiency anemia, apparently by blockage of the effects of copper, which is essential for iron transport in the blood. Male volunteers given vitamin C supplements developed iron deficiency anemia despite an adequate iron intake. (Science News 124:281, October 29, 1983)
Copyright 1983 Phylis Austin

Menarche and diet

August 10, 2008

Menarche (beginning of menstrual periods) is influenced by diet. A study from Loma Linda University reveals that meat eaters have menarche six-months earlier than vegetarians. Those who used meat analogues had menarche 9 months later than those who did not use meat analogues. The liberal use of beans and other legumes, grains and nuts was associated with a 5 to month delay in menarche when compared to a group which used these foods less freely. Early onset of menarche is known to be a risk factor for breast cancer. Previous studies have suggested a relationship between the use of animal products and early menstruation. (Nutrition Research 7(5)471-480, May 1987)
Copyright 1987 Phylis Austin

Hypertension, retinal degeneration, vegetarian diet

August 10, 2008

A study carried out in the Republic of China revealed that individuals on a strict vegetarian diet (no meat, fish, milk, eggs, and alcohol or tobacco) have less high blood pressure than persons consuming the typical non-vegetarian diet. Retinal arteriosclerosis was much less common in the vegetarians (19.8 percent vs. 42.9 percent). Degenerative disease of the retina of the eye was less common in vegetarians. In those vegetarians who did have abnormalities of the eyes, the changes
were much less profound than those in non-vegetarians. (Medical Tribune 27(32)3, 33, November, 1986)
Copyright 1986 Phylis Austin

Diabetes and vegetarian diet

August 10, 2008

A 21-year study of over 25,000 California Seventh-day Adventists revealed that the diabetes rate in vegetarians was only 45 percent of the United States rate in a similar study group. (American Journal of Public Health 75:507-512, 1985)
Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin

Vegetarian diet and colon cancer risk

August 10, 2008

A study done by a group of various research institutes in the United States has revealed that Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) vegetarians have a lower rate of growth of epithelial cells in the mucosa of the colon. As cell production increases the risk of colon cancer increases. This may partially explain the lower incidence of colon cancer observed in SDA vegetarians. (Cancer Letters 26:139-144, 1985)
Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin

Vegetarian diet and kidney stones

August 10, 2008

A diet low in animal protein lowers the risk of kidney stone formation according to a nationwide UK study. Vegetarians had a 40 to 60 percent lower rate of kidney stones than meat eaters. (European Neurology 8:334-339, 1982)
Copyright 1982 Phylis Austin