Archive for the ‘Dermatology’ Category

Boils, Vitamin C

July 3, 2009

Individuals who suffer from recurrent boils (furuncles) may benefit from the consumption of one gram of vitamin C per day. Twenty-three patients who tested negative for Staphylococcus infection (a common cause of boils) took vitamin C daily for four to six weeks demonstrated improvement.
(Journal of Infectious Diseases 173:1502-3, 1996)
Copyright 1996 Phylis A Austin

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Smoking and palmar-plantar pustulosis

July 11, 2008

A British study has revealed a link between palmar-plantar pustulosis and smoking. Conor St. J. O’Doherty of the University Department of Dermatology at the Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh noticed that many of his patients were smokers. He carried out a retrospective study and observed that 85 percent of them were smokers; of the non-smokers over half had smoked for 4 to 50 years. (Dermatology News 17(10)1, 11, November-December 1984) Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin

Chamomile for burns and diaper rash

July 4, 2008

Cooled chamomile tea or chamomile flowers added to bath water may be soothing for the inflammation of diaper rash or burns. Chamomile has been found to contain alpha-bisabolols, which contain anti-inflammatory qualities. (Medical Self Care (52)15, September- October, 1989)

Copyright 1989 Phylis Austin

Acne and diet

June 30, 2008

The impact of diet on acne has been a topic of great debate, with many arguing that foods such as chocolate do not have an effect on acne. The original study suggesting that chocolate does not cause acne was done using a synthetic chocolate as a placebo. Both groups were actually receiving chocolate!

Dr. Walter Schnur of Cincinnati writes that in his 30 years of medical practice he has observed that the use of milk and other forms of lactose worsens many cases of acne. He also points out that in 1961 the incoming president of the American Dermatologic Association pointed out that teenagers who consumed the most milk and carbohydrates had the most acne. (Consultant, December 1995, p. 1762)

Copyright 1996 Phylis A Austin

Oregon grape root for psoriasis

June 30, 2008

Extracts of Oregon grape root (Berberis aquifolium) have been applied to the skin in the treatment of psoriasis for many decades. It is now felt that berberine is the beneficial part of the plant. (American Journal of Natural Medicine 3(1)24, January-February 1996) Other berberine-containing herbs that may be just as effective as Oregon grape are Hydrastis canadensis and Berberis vulgaris.

Copyright 1996 Phylis A Austin

Honey for infected wounds

July 5, 2007

An Australian physician reports that he has found the application of honey a very effective treatment for a variety of infected wounds. (Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 83:127, February 1990)

Copyright 1990 Phylis A Austin

Chamomile for burns and diaper rash

July 5, 2007

Cooled chamomile tea or chamomile flowers added to bath water may be soothing for the inflammation of diaper rash or burns. Chamomile contains alpha-bisabolols, which have anti-inflammatory properties. (Medical Self Care (52)15, September-October 1989)

Copyright 1989 Phylis A Austin

Capsaicin and shingles

July 4, 2007

Seventy-five percent of a group of patients received substantial relief of their shingles (herpes zoster) pain by applying capsaicin to the painful areas over a four-week period. The capsaicin was applied in the form of a 0.25 percent cream five times a day for the first week, then three times a day for the next three weeks. This pain is difficult to treat with any medication.
(Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 17:93-96, 1987)

Copyright 1989 Phylis A Austin