Archive for the ‘First Aid’ Category

Jellyfish stings, cold packs

July 30, 2009

Cold packs or ice are very effective in relief of the pain associated with jellyfish stings according to report from the Surf Life-Saving Association of Australia. The treatment routine used in this study was to apply the cold pack for five to ten minutes. If pain was still present after ten minutes the ice was applied for another ten minutes. (Medical Journal of Australia 151:625-625, December 4-18, 1989) Copyright 1989 Phylis Austin

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Charcoal for childhood poisoning

July 4, 2008

A study from Finland revealed that failure to have charcoal in the home resulted in a significant delay in treatment of childhood poisoning. A study carried out by a Poison Control Center revealed that children whose parents had already purchased charcoal were treated within about 25 minutes of poisoning, but those whose parents had to buy charcoal were subjected to an average delay in treatment of over 40 minutes. (Human and Experimental Toxicology 12:92-93, 1993) We feel that every home should have charcoal readily available. Copyright 1993 Phylis Austin

Cold packs for jellyfish stings

July 5, 2007

Cold packs or ice applications are very effective for the relief of pain associated with jellyfish stings according to a report from the Surf Life-Saving Association of Australia. The treatment routine used in this study was to apply the cold pack for five to ten minutes. If the pain was still present after ten minutes the ice was applied for another ten minutes. (Medical Journal of Australia 151:625-516, December 4-18, 1989)

Copyright 1989 Phylis A Austin

Potato peel for burns

July 4, 2007

A study from India reported the use of boiled potato peel in the treatment of mild burns. Potatoes are soaked, washed, and boiled for 20 minutes in clean water. Peels are removed without any adherent pulp. Peels may be stored in cotton gauze saturated in normal saline, placed in sterilized bottles and stored at 4 degrees C.

To use the peels the doctors washed them in sterile saline and placed the inner surface of the peel against the burn. Two layers of saline-treated gauze were applied over the potato peel, then a bandage was placed over that. If the burn appeared infected the dressings were changed daily; if no infection was present redressing was done every 4 – 8 days. If little discharge was present when the peels were removed, the surface of the burn and the surface of the potato peel were wiped off and reapplied. If much discharge was present the peels were discarded, the wound cleaned with normal saline, and fresh potato peel applied. (Burns Including Thermal Injury 11(3)220-4, February, 1985) The potato peel acts as artificial skin.