Archive for the ‘Headache’ Category

Headaches, cold packs

July 30, 2009

Cold compresses have been used for headache remedy for many years. A study conducted at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine revealed that about 50 percent of patients who used a cold pack received immediate pain relief. Interestingly, migraine patients had the greatest pain relief. (Internal Medicine News 18(7)3, September 1-14, 1985) Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin

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MSG, monosodium glutamate, headaches

July 30, 2009

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) may cause headaches in sensitive individuals. Many who read food labels are unaware that MSG may be listed as “flavoring,” “natural flavoring,” or “hydrolyzed vegetable protein.” Hydrolyzed vegetable protein may be 10-30 percent MSG. (Headache 31:107-110, 1991) Copyright 1991 Phylis Austin

Headaches, cold packs

July 12, 2009

Cold compresses have been used for headache relief for many years. A study conducted at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine revealed that about 50 percent of patients who used a cold pack received immediate pain relief. Interesting, migraine patients had the greatest pain relief. (Internal medicine News 18(7)3, September 1-14, 1985)
Copyright 1985 Phylis A Austin

Nasal plug for cluster headache

July 10, 2008

A 64-year-old man who had suffered recurrent cluster headaches for more than five years observed that stuffing tissue up the left nostril produced an immediate improvement in his symptoms. He inserts the tissue for two or three hours at the beginning of a headache. (Headache 27:522-523, 1987) Copyright 1987 Phylis Austin

Headache and Epstein-Barr virus

July 9, 2008

Epstein-Barr virus may induce daily, persistent headaches reports Walter Vanast, a University of Alberta neurologist. Dr. Vanast’s patient population suffered daily headaches of sudden onset, with no prior precipitating events. He states that headache may be the only symptom in this newly-identified syndrome. Headaches in 68 percent of the male patients and 52 percent of female patients disappeared within six months without treatment. With two years 85 percent of the males and 73 percent of females were headache free. Dr. Vanast feels that these patients should be spared the use of numerous drugs, psychotherapy and psychiatrists. The best treatment to is reassure the patients that they will likely improve spontaneously within 24 months. (Medical Tribune 27(24)9, August 27, 1986) Copyright 1986 Phylis Austin