Archive for the ‘Hydrotherapy’ Category

Migraines, hand warming, brain blood flow

July 30, 2009

Warming the hands increases blood flow in the brain. Migraine suffererers have been taught to warm the hands to relieve their headaches. Blood flow increase in the left hemisphere is more marked than in the right. (Brain Mind Bulletin 5(11)1, April 21, 1980) Copyright 1980 Phylis Austin

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Hot bath epilepsy

July 30, 2009

There is a form of epilepsy in which hot baths trigger reflex epilepsy. This type of epilepsy is apparently quite common in India, but not many cases have been reported elsewhere in the world. The onset of this type of epilepsy is most frequently during childhood, and the child typically outgrows it within six years.
Researchers do not yet understand what triggers an epileptic seizure in all instances; but if it can be determined, avoiding the trigger would a more suitable treatment than antiepileptic medications. (Postgraduate Medical Journal 63:975-976, 1987) Sometimes a food is the trigger, sometimes some emotional or physical tension. The parents must carefully study their child. A diary can be helpful. Copyright 1987 Phylis Austin

Headaches, cold packs

July 30, 2009

Cold compresses have been used for headache remedy for many years. A study conducted at the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine revealed that about 50 percent of patients who used a cold pack received immediate pain relief. Interestingly, migraine patients had the greatest pain relief. (Internal Medicine News 18(7)3, September 1-14, 1985) Copyright 1985 Phylis Austin

Alcohol withdrawal, delirium tremens, cold baths,

July 30, 2009

Baths of 18 degrees C. (64.5 degrees F.) were effective in treating delirium tremens according to a report from France. The sufferer was placed in water up to his shoulders and cold water poured over his head. The baths may be given two or three times a day. The cases in the report slept quietly for two hours after each bath. (Journal of American Medical Association 26:616, March 28, 1986) Copyright 1986 Phylis Austin

BPH, benign prostate disease, hyperthermia

July 30, 2009

Researchers at the University of Southern California at Los Angeles are studying the use of heat in the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy. Similar research has been carried on in Israel for about six years with favorable results. A specially designed instrument is inserted for one hour at a time, twice a week for five weeks. The treatment is not painful; men remain awake during the procedure, but some some develop irritation of the urethra. Results thus far have been encouraging. Methodist Hospital of Indianapolis, Indiana, plans to begin a similar treatment program. (Medical World News 28(23)20,21, December 14, 1987) Copyright 1987 Phylis Austin

Hyperthermia, pregnancy, fetus

July 30, 2009

Hyperthermia (high body temperature ) has been shown to be capable of producing birth defects. The defects in the fetus vary with the amount of fever elevation and the stage of the fetus during exposure. Adverse effects include abortion, stillbirth, congenital malformations and embryonic resorption. Mental retardation, spina bifida, changes in muscle tome, and neurogenic arthrogryposis (limb defects) have occurred in association with hyperthermia in humans, while animal studies have demonstrated microcephaly (small brain), and clubfoot. Pregnant women should not be given fever treatment and should avoid hot tubs and sauna baths. (Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, August, 1987,p. 512-513) Copyright1987 Phylis Austin

Laryngitis, cough, ice pack

July 30, 2009

Vocal cords which become swollen during laryngitis with cough may be relieved by the use of an ice collar made by placing crushed ice in plastic wrap, and attaching it securely to the child’s throat. (Cordtlandt Forum, October, 1989) Copyright 1989 Phylis Austin

Migraine, ice pack

July 30, 2009

An ice pack may be helpful in pain relief for those who suffer migraine headaches. Dr. Lawrence D. Robbins, director of the Robbins Headache Clinic, says that patients who use ice packs while waiting for their pain medication to take effect reported faster relief of symptoms. The patients were told to wrap the ice pack around the head snugly enough to provide moderate pressure. Pain relief may begin in 12-15 minutes. (Emergency Medicine, August 15, 1990, p. 139-142) Copyright 1990 Phylis Austin

Common cold, local hyperthermia

July 30, 2009

Still another study shows that raising the temperature in the nose aids the body in recovering from a cold. Early data suggests that the treatment should be continued for about 30 minutes. Treatments may be repeated at about two hour intervals. (British Medical Journal 298:128, May 13, 1989) Copyright 1989 Phylis Austin

Jellyfish stings, cold packs

July 30, 2009

Cold packs or ice are very effective in relief of the pain associated with jellyfish stings according to report from the Surf Life-Saving Association of Australia. The treatment routine used in this study was to apply the cold pack for five to ten minutes. If pain was still present after ten minutes the ice was applied for another ten minutes. (Medical Journal of Australia 151:625-625, December 4-18, 1989) Copyright 1989 Phylis Austin